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Herbs for Depression

It should be noted that if you have serious depression, you might want to seek professional help. However, herbs have helped me. They are calming and soothing and can also, instead of having side effects of making you lethargic, actually improve your energy levels. Herbs are not as fast acting or powerful as psychiatric medications. They also need to be given time.

Motherwort
Motherwort is the herb for depression I have used most commonly. It is known as a nerve tonic and is really good for anxiety. Motherwort is very soothing. The best way to take it, due to its bitter taste is in tincture form. 10-30 drops a day every day is what’s advised. I took it in the morning, but you can also take it before bed to help insomnia. It can be effective immediately in high stress situations and should be taken every 5 to 10 minutes.

Skull Cap
Skull cap can be make you very sleepy, so be aware of that before taking. I like to take it before bed. It escalates the nervous system during times of stress and can be used to treat anxiety, depression, and insomnia. There is also a difference between American and Chinese skull cap and American is the variety you want when attempting to treat depression. It’s good as in infusion or tincture several times a day.

Oatstraw
Oatstraw infusion is a great way to treat depression. You make an infusion by a cup of the dried herbs in a quart of boiling water, steeping for four hours, then straining. Refrigerate and drink as needed. It’s most effective when used over time and can also be very relaxing.

Lavender
Lavender is a wonderful nerve tonic, good for headaches, migraines, depression, restlessness, and stress. It’s incredibly calming and works in many ways. I love to use lavender essential oil, personally. It’s also great as a tea, tincture, in oils, and in the bath tub.

Lemon Balm
Lemon balm, pat of the mint family, is a mild sedative that soothes the nervous system in a gentle way. It helps anxiety and works with the thyroid an output of excess T3 (which can cause tension). It helps insomnia, pains, headaches, and can calm the stomach. It can be used as a tincture, but also makes a delicious tea. I’ve never taken it specifically for depression, but love to use it for beverage teas rather than medicinal infusions.

Licorice
Licorice is wonderful in any tea or decoction to enhance flavor and is also available as capsules and extractions. Licorice actually contains glycyrrhzin that helps the body breakdown cortisol so it can better deal with stress. It also contains natural serotonin reuptake inhibitors. I use it in most teas I make and I advise it. Just watch out for any side effects.

Hops
Hops are incredibly bitter, so it’s best as a tincture. It’s effective for insomnia and is relaxing to the nervous system. However, since hops is a strong sedative some say it can make depression worse. If used, use at night and pay close attention to how you feel.

Kava
Kava is a wonderful herb because it heightens awareness while relieving stress and relaxing. It helps insomnia and anxiety disorders. Watch your dosage however, because it can make you sleepy. A tincture is best for treating depression. Kava should be taken with moderation and can impair liver functioning. Do not take it with medications or two weeks before surgery. It is a very strong diuretic.

St. John’s Wort
St John’s Wort is one of the most commonly recommended herbs for depression. I have never taken it because it can effect psychiatric medication and speeds liver functioning. You should not take it with any medications. However, it has strong scientific evidence as being very effective for treating depression.

GLA or Gamma-linolenic acid
GLA is found in evening primrose, borage and black currant seed oils. Hops also contains GLA. Essential fatty acid/GLA deficiency can cause depression, so taking capsules that contain GLA can be effective.

(picture source)

Last week I realized the solstice was coming and I had nothing planned and Cernunnos was upset (He knocks his candle over when he wants something). The words wouldn’t come to me for a spell or ritual, so I panicked for a bit. However, my husband and I just finished a part of our rock wall, and I had the idea last night to plant my beautiful Japanese Butterfly Maple this morning to honor the solstice and Cernunnos. Just as I finished putting it in the ground, the sun came up over the neighbors house and bathed it in light. I think He is pleased with me now.

Happy summer solstice everyone! I hope it turns out as well as you wish it to!

punchbuggydragon:

myhumbleofferings:

devoteeofpoppies:

arcanemysteries:

How To Calculate Your Tarot Birth Cards.

The Secret Language of Birthdays book that I have has each day’s tarot card listed on the page!

Personality Card: Death. WHY IS IT ALWAYS DEATH. THIS CARD. CONSTANTLY. ALWAYS.

Soul Card: The Emperor. Merrr, I don’t like this card. It’s so stuffy and stodgy. 

Personality card: The Lovers

Soul Card: The lovers

Birth Card : The devil 

Birth Card:  The Hanged Man

Personality Card:  The Hanged Man

Soul Card:  The Empress

hedge-walker:

dharmainitiativeswan:

crazyscienceshit:

Booze!
Step 1. Fill a bunch of jars 3/4 full with fruit.  Any fruit.  Or hot peppers. I don’t care.  Fruit that is large should be cut.  Fruit that has a peel should be peeled.  Pictured is raspberry/blackberry and cantelope.  Canteloop? Cantelupe?  I’m not gonna deal with autocorrect tonight.
Step 2. Add lots of sugar.  I’m using half gallon jars and I put in a heaping cup of sugar for each.  For some fruits, like apples, use honey.  I don’t know why honey just works better with apples.  Probably pears too.  Add some cinnamon or some other spice that will compliment the mixture.  I put cayenne pepper in the melon because I’m a monster.
Step 3. Fill with liquor and seal. Not the cheap stuff because be classy, but not too expensive because it will go to waste.  For this batch I used regular Smirnoff.  Different liquors will work better with different fruits.
Step 4. Wait.  The first couple days rotate the jars a few times until the sugar is completely dissolved.  The liquor will almost immediately start taking the color of the fruit.  Eventually, all of the fruit will look very bleached and that’s how you know it’s done.  You’ll want to collect the liquid in a separate container to make it easier to serve.  You can also eat the fruit.  It doesn’t taste good but it will get you trashed.
Step 5. Drink the liquid.  Have a party or something?  It’s good, everyone will love it.

This is my husband’s Tumblr. He’s new. Follow him if you like any of the following:
Crazy science shit
Nintendo Power Gloves
DIY
Booze
Electricity
SCIENCE!
Nerdstuff
Hilarity
Me. 

Hey!
Awesome post! I love seeing Tumblr users making cordials and boozy concoctions. To add a few thoughts:
1) Pair your fruit to your booze.  Vodka apples are pretty good, but brandy or whiskey with apples, cinnamon, and honey are better. I’ve made a handy list of pairings that I prefer, but don’t take my experiences as truth. Test things out yourself!
Apples-Whiskey, burboun, brandy
Pears-brandy
Plums-brandy, vodka
Peaches- vodka, rum, spiced rum
Cherries- brandy, vodka, spiced rum
Grapes (concord)- vodka
Grapes (table)- vodka
Strawberry- vodka
Raspberry- vodka
Blackberry- brandy, vodka
Cucumber-gin, vodka
Pineapple-rum
orange-vodka, rum
lemon, lime-gin, vodka, rum
watermelon-vodka
cantaloupe-vodka
honeydew-vodka
2) Pair with herbs. You can really play with the depth of your cordial flavors with herbal infusions such as mint and watermelon, cucumber and mint, basil and watermelon, spearmint and blueberry, etc. Look to common pairings for inspiration or create your own. Just wash and bruise the leaves by rolling them between your palms and add them at the bottom of your mason jar and shake with your fruit and liquor.
3) As for sweeteners, they aren’t required. I can’t have a lot of sugar so I try have refined my tastes to enjoy cordials sans sweeteners and even if you are a sucker for sweet drinks you might find that a strawberry lemon vodka is sweet enough on it’s own. If you want to go without sweetener, but aren’t sure about the quality product you will make there are a few things to do that will help you succeed. First, choose fruits with a higher amount of naturally occurring sugar. It might surprise you that oranges and melons are up there, but berries, despite being lower GI foods work well, too. Second, use quality liquor. If I am not using sweetener I typically use something ranging from Titos to Belvedere vodka. Skip smirnoff, Mr. Boston and anything that comes in a large plastic bottle. Less is more here when creating a quality unsweetened cordial. Lastly, you can strain and replenish with fresh fruit after a week or so to create a more flavorful cordial, just keep sanitation in mind.
4) Speaking of sanitation the wine maker and brewer in me needs to remind you that any cordials do not contain a high enough alcohol content for you to forgo sanitation. Fruit rots and lower alcohol content cordials such as those with large amounts of sweeteners and water or juice added can go bad. Keep things cold if possible and sealed well. Keep your workspace clean, wash you hands often and wash your produce before using. A 10% bleach solution on your glassware and utensils for 3-5 min is a good way to start each experiment session to ensure you won’t end up on the toilet.
Zoom Info
hedge-walker:

dharmainitiativeswan:

crazyscienceshit:

Booze!
Step 1. Fill a bunch of jars 3/4 full with fruit.  Any fruit.  Or hot peppers. I don’t care.  Fruit that is large should be cut.  Fruit that has a peel should be peeled.  Pictured is raspberry/blackberry and cantelope.  Canteloop? Cantelupe?  I’m not gonna deal with autocorrect tonight.
Step 2. Add lots of sugar.  I’m using half gallon jars and I put in a heaping cup of sugar for each.  For some fruits, like apples, use honey.  I don’t know why honey just works better with apples.  Probably pears too.  Add some cinnamon or some other spice that will compliment the mixture.  I put cayenne pepper in the melon because I’m a monster.
Step 3. Fill with liquor and seal. Not the cheap stuff because be classy, but not too expensive because it will go to waste.  For this batch I used regular Smirnoff.  Different liquors will work better with different fruits.
Step 4. Wait.  The first couple days rotate the jars a few times until the sugar is completely dissolved.  The liquor will almost immediately start taking the color of the fruit.  Eventually, all of the fruit will look very bleached and that’s how you know it’s done.  You’ll want to collect the liquid in a separate container to make it easier to serve.  You can also eat the fruit.  It doesn’t taste good but it will get you trashed.
Step 5. Drink the liquid.  Have a party or something?  It’s good, everyone will love it.

This is my husband’s Tumblr. He’s new. Follow him if you like any of the following:
Crazy science shit
Nintendo Power Gloves
DIY
Booze
Electricity
SCIENCE!
Nerdstuff
Hilarity
Me. 

Hey!
Awesome post! I love seeing Tumblr users making cordials and boozy concoctions. To add a few thoughts:
1) Pair your fruit to your booze.  Vodka apples are pretty good, but brandy or whiskey with apples, cinnamon, and honey are better. I’ve made a handy list of pairings that I prefer, but don’t take my experiences as truth. Test things out yourself!
Apples-Whiskey, burboun, brandy
Pears-brandy
Plums-brandy, vodka
Peaches- vodka, rum, spiced rum
Cherries- brandy, vodka, spiced rum
Grapes (concord)- vodka
Grapes (table)- vodka
Strawberry- vodka
Raspberry- vodka
Blackberry- brandy, vodka
Cucumber-gin, vodka
Pineapple-rum
orange-vodka, rum
lemon, lime-gin, vodka, rum
watermelon-vodka
cantaloupe-vodka
honeydew-vodka
2) Pair with herbs. You can really play with the depth of your cordial flavors with herbal infusions such as mint and watermelon, cucumber and mint, basil and watermelon, spearmint and blueberry, etc. Look to common pairings for inspiration or create your own. Just wash and bruise the leaves by rolling them between your palms and add them at the bottom of your mason jar and shake with your fruit and liquor.
3) As for sweeteners, they aren’t required. I can’t have a lot of sugar so I try have refined my tastes to enjoy cordials sans sweeteners and even if you are a sucker for sweet drinks you might find that a strawberry lemon vodka is sweet enough on it’s own. If you want to go without sweetener, but aren’t sure about the quality product you will make there are a few things to do that will help you succeed. First, choose fruits with a higher amount of naturally occurring sugar. It might surprise you that oranges and melons are up there, but berries, despite being lower GI foods work well, too. Second, use quality liquor. If I am not using sweetener I typically use something ranging from Titos to Belvedere vodka. Skip smirnoff, Mr. Boston and anything that comes in a large plastic bottle. Less is more here when creating a quality unsweetened cordial. Lastly, you can strain and replenish with fresh fruit after a week or so to create a more flavorful cordial, just keep sanitation in mind.
4) Speaking of sanitation the wine maker and brewer in me needs to remind you that any cordials do not contain a high enough alcohol content for you to forgo sanitation. Fruit rots and lower alcohol content cordials such as those with large amounts of sweeteners and water or juice added can go bad. Keep things cold if possible and sealed well. Keep your workspace clean, wash you hands often and wash your produce before using. A 10% bleach solution on your glassware and utensils for 3-5 min is a good way to start each experiment session to ensure you won’t end up on the toilet.
Zoom Info
hedge-walker:

dharmainitiativeswan:

crazyscienceshit:

Booze!
Step 1. Fill a bunch of jars 3/4 full with fruit.  Any fruit.  Or hot peppers. I don’t care.  Fruit that is large should be cut.  Fruit that has a peel should be peeled.  Pictured is raspberry/blackberry and cantelope.  Canteloop? Cantelupe?  I’m not gonna deal with autocorrect tonight.
Step 2. Add lots of sugar.  I’m using half gallon jars and I put in a heaping cup of sugar for each.  For some fruits, like apples, use honey.  I don’t know why honey just works better with apples.  Probably pears too.  Add some cinnamon or some other spice that will compliment the mixture.  I put cayenne pepper in the melon because I’m a monster.
Step 3. Fill with liquor and seal. Not the cheap stuff because be classy, but not too expensive because it will go to waste.  For this batch I used regular Smirnoff.  Different liquors will work better with different fruits.
Step 4. Wait.  The first couple days rotate the jars a few times until the sugar is completely dissolved.  The liquor will almost immediately start taking the color of the fruit.  Eventually, all of the fruit will look very bleached and that’s how you know it’s done.  You’ll want to collect the liquid in a separate container to make it easier to serve.  You can also eat the fruit.  It doesn’t taste good but it will get you trashed.
Step 5. Drink the liquid.  Have a party or something?  It’s good, everyone will love it.

This is my husband’s Tumblr. He’s new. Follow him if you like any of the following:
Crazy science shit
Nintendo Power Gloves
DIY
Booze
Electricity
SCIENCE!
Nerdstuff
Hilarity
Me. 

Hey!
Awesome post! I love seeing Tumblr users making cordials and boozy concoctions. To add a few thoughts:
1) Pair your fruit to your booze.  Vodka apples are pretty good, but brandy or whiskey with apples, cinnamon, and honey are better. I’ve made a handy list of pairings that I prefer, but don’t take my experiences as truth. Test things out yourself!
Apples-Whiskey, burboun, brandy
Pears-brandy
Plums-brandy, vodka
Peaches- vodka, rum, spiced rum
Cherries- brandy, vodka, spiced rum
Grapes (concord)- vodka
Grapes (table)- vodka
Strawberry- vodka
Raspberry- vodka
Blackberry- brandy, vodka
Cucumber-gin, vodka
Pineapple-rum
orange-vodka, rum
lemon, lime-gin, vodka, rum
watermelon-vodka
cantaloupe-vodka
honeydew-vodka
2) Pair with herbs. You can really play with the depth of your cordial flavors with herbal infusions such as mint and watermelon, cucumber and mint, basil and watermelon, spearmint and blueberry, etc. Look to common pairings for inspiration or create your own. Just wash and bruise the leaves by rolling them between your palms and add them at the bottom of your mason jar and shake with your fruit and liquor.
3) As for sweeteners, they aren’t required. I can’t have a lot of sugar so I try have refined my tastes to enjoy cordials sans sweeteners and even if you are a sucker for sweet drinks you might find that a strawberry lemon vodka is sweet enough on it’s own. If you want to go without sweetener, but aren’t sure about the quality product you will make there are a few things to do that will help you succeed. First, choose fruits with a higher amount of naturally occurring sugar. It might surprise you that oranges and melons are up there, but berries, despite being lower GI foods work well, too. Second, use quality liquor. If I am not using sweetener I typically use something ranging from Titos to Belvedere vodka. Skip smirnoff, Mr. Boston and anything that comes in a large plastic bottle. Less is more here when creating a quality unsweetened cordial. Lastly, you can strain and replenish with fresh fruit after a week or so to create a more flavorful cordial, just keep sanitation in mind.
4) Speaking of sanitation the wine maker and brewer in me needs to remind you that any cordials do not contain a high enough alcohol content for you to forgo sanitation. Fruit rots and lower alcohol content cordials such as those with large amounts of sweeteners and water or juice added can go bad. Keep things cold if possible and sealed well. Keep your workspace clean, wash you hands often and wash your produce before using. A 10% bleach solution on your glassware and utensils for 3-5 min is a good way to start each experiment session to ensure you won’t end up on the toilet.
Zoom Info

hedge-walker:

dharmainitiativeswan:

crazyscienceshit:

Booze!

Step 1. Fill a bunch of jars 3/4 full with fruit.  Any fruit.  Or hot peppers. I don’t care.  Fruit that is large should be cut.  Fruit that has a peel should be peeled.  Pictured is raspberry/blackberry and cantelope.  Canteloop? Cantelupe?  I’m not gonna deal with autocorrect tonight.

Step 2. Add lots of sugar.  I’m using half gallon jars and I put in a heaping cup of sugar for each.  For some fruits, like apples, use honey.  I don’t know why honey just works better with apples.  Probably pears too.  Add some cinnamon or some other spice that will compliment the mixture.  I put cayenne pepper in the melon because I’m a monster.

Step 3. Fill with liquor and seal. Not the cheap stuff because be classy, but not too expensive because it will go to waste.  For this batch I used regular Smirnoff.  Different liquors will work better with different fruits.

Step 4. Wait.  The first couple days rotate the jars a few times until the sugar is completely dissolved.  The liquor will almost immediately start taking the color of the fruit.  Eventually, all of the fruit will look very bleached and that’s how you know it’s done.  You’ll want to collect the liquid in a separate container to make it easier to serve.  You can also eat the fruit.  It doesn’t taste good but it will get you trashed.

Step 5. Drink the liquid.  Have a party or something?  It’s good, everyone will love it.

This is my husband’s Tumblr. He’s new. Follow him if you like any of the following:

  • Crazy science shit
  • Nintendo Power Gloves
  • DIY
  • Booze
  • Electricity
  • SCIENCE!
  • Nerdstuff
  • Hilarity
  • Me. 

Hey!

Awesome post! I love seeing Tumblr users making cordials and boozy concoctions. To add a few thoughts:

1) Pair your fruit to your booze.  Vodka apples are pretty good, but brandy or whiskey with apples, cinnamon, and honey are better. I’ve made a handy list of pairings that I prefer, but don’t take my experiences as truth. Test things out yourself!

Apples-Whiskey, burboun, brandy

Pears-brandy

Plums-brandy, vodka

Peaches- vodka, rum, spiced rum

Cherries- brandy, vodka, spiced rum

Grapes (concord)- vodka

Grapes (table)- vodka

Strawberry- vodka

Raspberry- vodka

Blackberry- brandy, vodka

Cucumber-gin, vodka

Pineapple-rum

orange-vodka, rum

lemon, lime-gin, vodka, rum

watermelon-vodka

cantaloupe-vodka

honeydew-vodka

2) Pair with herbs. You can really play with the depth of your cordial flavors with herbal infusions such as mint and watermelon, cucumber and mint, basil and watermelon, spearmint and blueberry, etc. Look to common pairings for inspiration or create your own. Just wash and bruise the leaves by rolling them between your palms and add them at the bottom of your mason jar and shake with your fruit and liquor.

3) As for sweeteners, they aren’t required. I can’t have a lot of sugar so I try have refined my tastes to enjoy cordials sans sweeteners and even if you are a sucker for sweet drinks you might find that a strawberry lemon vodka is sweet enough on it’s own. If you want to go without sweetener, but aren’t sure about the quality product you will make there are a few things to do that will help you succeed. First, choose fruits with a higher amount of naturally occurring sugar. It might surprise you that oranges and melons are up there, but berries, despite being lower GI foods work well, too. Second, use quality liquor. If I am not using sweetener I typically use something ranging from Titos to Belvedere vodka. Skip smirnoff, Mr. Boston and anything that comes in a large plastic bottle. Less is more here when creating a quality unsweetened cordial. Lastly, you can strain and replenish with fresh fruit after a week or so to create a more flavorful cordial, just keep sanitation in mind.

4) Speaking of sanitation the wine maker and brewer in me needs to remind you that any cordials do not contain a high enough alcohol content for you to forgo sanitation. Fruit rots and lower alcohol content cordials such as those with large amounts of sweeteners and water or juice added can go bad. Keep things cold if possible and sealed well. Keep your workspace clean, wash you hands often and wash your produce before using. A 10% bleach solution on your glassware and utensils for 3-5 min is a good way to start each experiment session to ensure you won’t end up on the toilet.

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